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NEWS

Food Area

How commercial dog food affects your dog's health

Every day, unhappy dogs parade through veterinary offices. They suffer from:

  • itching

  • hot spots

  • dandruff

  • excessive shedding

  • foot-licking

  • face-rubbing

  • loose stools

gassiness.

http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/health/articles/feeding-homemade-dog-food.html

Training & Behavior

"What’s the secret? The number one secret is to stay calm. The more you scream and try to move the more aroused you’ll make the dog—here are the two scenarios.

Say you’re running along and a dog comes sprinting out from his front yard. If you run faster, you may elicit a chase reflex, the same reflex triggered when a dog sees a cat or a squirrel run by. What you should do instead is face the dog and stand still, like a pole or a tree. Your arms can be folded in front of you so that you don’t accidentally swing them around.

What do you do if you can’t hold still because you’re scared? If the dog starts jumping up on you still try to remain calm and keep your back to the dog so that the dog can’t get to your face. If the dog actually takes you to the ground, roll up in a ball with your knees bend and your hands around the back of your neck and hold as still as possible....

...Remember, most dogs that rush towards you on the street aren’t out to bite you. Try to stay relaxed and you’ll be much more likely to remain safe"

https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/dog-bites-what-to-do-when-attacked/

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Health Center

7 Things You Can Do to Keep Your Pet Healthy

 

1.Keep your pet at a healthy weight.

2.Exercise your pet.

3.Feed your pet a balanced, nutritious diet.

4.Have your veterinarian examine your pet at least once a year to make sure your pet is healthy and to help detect problems earlier.

5.Vaccinate your pet against potentially deadly diseases such as distemper, parvo, panleukopenia and rabies.

6.Keep your pet free of parasites (fleas and ticks, heartworm, etc.) – consult your veterinarian for the best product for your pet.

7.Spay or neuter your pet.

https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/pet-health.aspx

Travel Essentials

 

Taking his first flight can be a somewhat traumatic experience for a dog that's used to sticking his head out the car window and enjoying the sights along the way. After all, his view just won't be the same from underneath the seat in front of you, or even worse, from the cargo hold. But getting there can still be half the fun if you follow the ten tips below and make sure you're familiar with the Airline Pet Policy, restrictions on Pet Travel in the US, and any additional International Pet Travel restrictions at your destination.

10 TIPS 

1. BOOK EARLY

Most airlines only allow one or two dogs on each flight, so it's important to book your dog's ticket as soon as possible. Don't buy your ticket until you call the airline and make sure there is a "seat" available for your dog on the flight. Once the agent has confirmed availability, reserve both your seats on the same ticket while you're still on the phone with the agent.

2. FLY DIRECT

Book a non-stop, direct flight whenever possible and try to fly on a weekday when airports are typically less hectic. If your pet will be traveling in the cargo hold, it's best to fly in the morning or evening during the summer, and midday during the winter to avoid extremely hot or cold temperatures.

3. VISIT THE VETERINARIAN

Make an appointment with your pet's veterinarian for a check-up and make sure all vaccinations are up to date. Obtain a health certificate from your veterinarian dated within 10 days of departure. For travel outside the continental United States, additional planning and health care requirements may be necessary. Visit our International Pet Travel or contact the foreign office of the country you are traveling to for more information.

4. BUY A CARRIER

Whether your dog is a Chihuahua or a Great Dane, there's a pet carrier to match. Carriers are available in both hard-sided and soft-sided. Soft-sided carriers are more suitable for carry-on and tend to fit better under the seat, but they're only permitted in the cabin only. To make sure the carrier will fit under the seat on your flight check the size restrictions of the airline in our Airline Pet Policies section. If your dog will be traveling in the cargo hold, purchase a hard plastic carrier with holes for ventilation instead. Carriers must be big enough for your dog to stand, turn around, and lie down comfortably. If the carrier does not permit him to do this, the airline will refuse transport.

5. CAN I SEE SOME ID M'AAM?

After you've purchased an appropriate carrier, write your dog's name on it and include identification tags with your home address and phone number as well as the address and phone number of someone who can be reached at your destination. Carry a current photograph of your pet as well. If he's lost during the trip, a photograph will make it much easier for airline employees or the local authorities to search effectively. You might also want to consider a permanent form of id (such as a microchip or tattoo) that will increase the likelihood of reuniting with your dog if he gets lost on the trip.

6. TAKE A TEST DRIVE

Animals travel under less stress when they are accustomed to their carrier before they travel. In the weeks prior to your trip, put your dog in his carrier as often as possible for trips around town.

7. EAT. DRINK. POOP. PLAY.

Since a full stomach might be uncomfortable for your dog during travel, we recommend feeding him about four hours before the flight, if possible. While it's best to refrain from feeding your dog right before the flight, you can (and should) continue to give him water right up to the time of travel. Just be sure to empty the dish before checking in so it doesn't spill during the flight. If you're checking the dog, leave the dishes in the carrier so an airline employee can provide your pet with food and water in the event of an extended delay before or after your flight. You should also exercise your pet and let him use the facilities (i.e. grass) before heading to the airport.

8. ARRIVE EARLY

Arrive at the airport early, but not too early, and have your dog's health certificate handy. You will not be allowed to check your pet in more than four hours before the flight. Most airlines recommend arriving two hours before your flight when traveling with a pet. Passengers with pets must check-in at the counter; curbside and self service check-in are not allowed.

9. (DON'T) TAKE A VALIUM

We don't mind if you take a valium before the flight, but don't give your pet tranquilizers just because you're nervous. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, in most cases, dogs should not be given sedatives or tranquilizers prior to flying because they can create respiratory and cardiovascular problems as the dog is exposed to increased altitude pressures. They can also alter the animal's natural ability to balance and maintain equilibrium, which can be dangerous when the carrier is moved. While sedation is generally not advised, the decision on whether or not to prescribe a tranquilizer for your pet should be made by your veterinarian. If he or she decides that tranquilizers are medically necessary for the trip, indicate the name of the drug taken and the dosage on the dog's carrier.

10. YOU'VE ARRIVED!

When you arrive at your destination, go for a long walk before you check-in at the hotel. Your dog will feel more comfortable as soon as he sees (and smells) his new surroundings, and realizes that the same rules and boundaries apply here too. By the time you check into the hotel, your dog will already feel right and home and be ready for whatever adventures are in store for him that week.

PACKING LIST

Don't forget these items when packing your dog's suitcase:

  • Health certificate and medical records

  • Contact information for your regular veterinarian and an emergency contact at your destination

  • Comb, brush, and flea control products

  • Any special medication your dog might need

  • Spare collar with id tag

  • Pet wipes or grooming products

  • Paper towels and stain remover

  • Enough dog food and treats for the entire trip

  • Plenty of bottled water (a sudden change can upset your dog's stomach)

  • Food and water dishes

  • Leash and poop bags

  • Your dog's favorite toy and blanket

A list of dog friendly restaurants and attractions at your destination

http://www.bringfido.com/travel/top_10_tips/

Grooming

Routine Care

Your dog’s regular grooming/maintenance routine should include regular ear checks. This is especially important for dogs who produce excessive earwax or have a lot of inner-ear hair:

 

  • If your dog’s inner ears appear dirty, clean them with a cotton ball dampened with mineral oil, hydrogen peroxide or a solution formulated specifically for this purpose. Inner-ear skin is delicate, so allow your vet to demonstrate the proper method for cleaning your dog’s ears.

  • Do not clean your dog’s ears so frequently or deeply as to cause irritation, and take care to NEVER insert anything into your dog’s ear canal.

  • If your dog sprouts hair from his ear canal, you or your groomer may have to tweeze it out every few weeks to prevent problematic mats and tangles from forming. Please discuss with your vet whether this is necessary for your dog.

Wet Behind the Ears?

If you’re not careful, frequent bathing and swimming can lead to irritation and infection. To prevent this from happening, place cotton in your dog’s ears before baths, and be sure to dry her ears as thoroughly as you safely can after all water sports and activities.

If your dog is prone to ear infections, you might want to pour a tiny amount of an ear drying solution made for dogs into her ear canals to help evaporate any water trapped inside. These ear washes, usually witch hazel-based, are available at better pet supply stores.

Danger Signs

Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following symptoms affecting your dog’s ears:

  • Ear discharge

  • Bad smells

  • Redness

  • Swelling

  • Crusty skin

  • Hair loss

Please also be aware that brown or black ear wax-and dry, dark wax resembling coffee grounds-are classic indicators of microscopic ear mites. Only your vet can tell for sure, so please don’t delay bringing a gooey-eared pooch in for a checkup.

http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/guide/ear-care-dogs

The Most Popular Family-Friendly Dogs

 

While Lassie and Lady and the Tramp are fun to watch, they’re probably not the best way to choose the family dog. Let petMD help you discover the best dogs for kids.

You can choose good family dogs based on three major factors:

Temperament – This is the dog’s personality. You should be looking for an agreeable temperament. For instance, a calmer dog has the ability to form strong bonds and be a great companion for your kids.

Size – Size should be looked at in relation to both temperament and energy level. Some larger dogs tend to be docile, while some smaller dogs can be excitable. 

Energy level – This is a matter of preference for your family. Be realistic about the lifestyle you can provide to a dog that needs more exercise than average. If you can’t meet a dog’s needs, his excess energy can lead to behavior problems down the road. 

Always meet the dog and ask the breeder or shelter worker a few questions before making such an important decision.

Here are five sample questions to ask, according to Holly Putnam, DVM, board member for the Association of Shelter Veterinarians:

1.Is the dog safe for all members of the family? Some dogs are perfectly happy to socialize with everyone in the family, while some prefer only adults or one gender.

2.What type of energy level is the dog?  You may want a dog that will accompany you and the family on long walks, or one that can be carried in your arms the majority of the time.

3.What ongoing care will the dog require? Is it a longhaired dog who will need regular grooming, or a senior who may need more frequent veterinary visits?

4.What age of dog are you looking for? Would you prefer a puppy who may require lots of training but will likely socialize well with the entire family, or would you prefer an adult dog who is potty trained, but may be more shy when friends come visit?

5.Will this dog get along with other pets? If you have other pets at home, you will want to choose a dog that likes other animals, and be sure that your animals like the new dog.

Without further ado, here are 10 kid-friendly dog breeds approved by petMD experts. 

10. Bull Dog

9.Beagle

8.Bull Terrier

7.Collie

6. Newfoundland

5.Vizla

4.Irish Setter

3.Poodle

2.Labrador Retriever

1.Golden Retriever

http://www.petmd.com/dog/top_tens/evr_dg_top_10_for_kids

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